Whether you’re getting a checkup at your doctor’s office or visiting a friend at the hospital, you can’t just walk-in. You need to check in. It’s reassuring that medical facilities value safety and security.

“If you check in, our technology and service does a real time check to determine what your privileges are,” says Mike Sheehan, CEO of IntelliCentrics, an operational security and compliance management company, whose subscription based service called SEC3URE™, can credential individuals and groups who enter medical facilities.

Hospitals work hard to welcome everyone, from medical staff to patients, guests and vendors.

“What if making the world a safer place meant letting people in?” asks Sheehan, noting anyone entering a facility must meet certain requirements pre-determined by law and by the facility, such as who can access specific areas like the operating room or see medical charts.

Exceeding regulation expectations

While The Joint Commission and Centers for Disease Control and Prevention have regulations about safety, many medical facilities are doing more.

“What if making the world a safer place meant letting people in? If you check in, our technology and service does a real time check to determine what your privileges are."

“Our patients and employees need to be assured that all others entering our hospital critical care areas have appropriate personal care safeguards,” says Brent T. Johnson, Vice President Supply Chain & Support Services for Utah’s Intermountain healthcare, which has been Intellicentric credentialed for six years.

Over 6,500 hospitals, including Mercy Hospital and Medical Center in Chicago, are using Intellicentric’s credentialing services, which helps ensure anyone at the facility is authorized to be on-site.

“It has allowed us to do a better job of tracking and maintaining the proper documentation for our clinicians,” says Quincy Stanley, Mercy Hospital’s supply chain manager. “It ensures the proper requirements that are identified by our hospital, are met before access is granted to work in our facility.”

Cost management

Credentialing is cost-effective too. While credentialing costs $1.1 million a year, not credentialing can run $5.8 million annually. For example, if a hospital has an adverse event, such as when patients get hospital-acquired infections, the facility has to pay those fees, not insurance.

“It saves lives,” says Sheehan, who compares hospital safety to aviation, saying both are industries where, “we can’t take shortcuts.”