There’s a myth floating around that attending a medical school in the Caribbean somehow delegitimizes the degree or experience. However, this couldn’t be farther from the truth; in fact, a medical degree from a school in the Caribbean is a viable option for many.

High acceptance rates

One of the biggest benefits of applying to a medical school in the Caribbean is that the acceptance rates are much higher than schools based in the U.S. For example, the Ross University School of Medicine accepted 38 percent of applicants in 2010.

In the U.S., acceptance rates for medical school can be discouragingly low. A Caribbean school is also a great option for those who may have been rejected to a U.S.-based school.

“This makes these schools a much more viable option for those who struggle on standardized tests.”

Lower GPA and MCAT scores

Additionally, Caribbean schools have lower expectations for GPA and MCAT scores compared to U.S. schools. St. George University in Grenada, for instance, accepted students with an average GPA of 3.4 and MCAT score of 27. This makes these schools a much more viable option for those who struggle on standardized tests.

When it comes down to it, medical schools in the U.S. and Caribbean teach the same material. Additionally, beginning in 2023, if the Caribbean school you attend is certified by the Educational Commission for Foreign Medical Graduates, you can become licensed in the U.S. and Canada. Many also have affiliations with clinical sites and teaching hospitals for its students to complete their clinical training.